Wednesday, July 26, 2017
 
A more acidic Arctic? NOAA deploys first buoy in region to monitor levels of CO2 absorbed by ocean

 | 

A more acidic Arctic? NOAA deploys first buoy in region to monitor levels of CO2 absorbed by ocean

NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in partnership with the Marine Research Institute in Iceland deployed the first high-latitude ocean acidification monitoring buoy in the Atlantic Ocean in early August.  The moored buoy is the first of its kind to be deployed north of the Arctic circle in a region where very little is known about how carbon dioxide (CO2) is entering the ocean environment. 

A sea change in the Arctic atmosphere

Thinning sea ice in spring affects ozone chemistry with implications for mercury contamination

 | 

A sea change in the Arctic atmosphere

Arctic warming has thinned springtime sea ice across the Arctic Ocean. A new study shows that this alters the chemistry of the atmosphere near the Earth’s surface and may increase the amount of toxic mercury contaminating the region.

Arctic set for record-breaking melt this summer

Wildlife, scientists will be scrambling to adapt

 | 

Arctic set for record-breaking melt this summer

The record heat baking Alaska is poised to smash a host of climate records in 2016, including the earliest snowmelt date at NOAA’s Barrow Observatory, the northernmost point in the nation.


As Alaska warms, methane emissions appear stable

Fate of carbon stored in permafrost remains subject of intense research

 | 

As Alaska warms, methane emissions appear stable

Analysis of nearly three decades of air samples from Alaska’s North Slope shows little change in long-term methane emissions despite significant Arctic warming over that time period, according to new research published in Geophysical Research Letters.

Climate models show carbon emission mitigation could slow Arctic temperature increases

 | 

Climate models show carbon emission mitigation could slow Arctic temperature increases

NOAA-led research using climate model projections concludes the Arctic climate will continue to show major changes over the next decades, but that carbon emission mitigation could slow temperature changes in the second half of the century, according to a paper published by AGU’s Earth’s Future.

123456

Latest Profiles

Barnes, Elizabeth

Barnes, Elizabeth

Questioning rivers in the sky

Maloney, Eric

Maloney, Eric

Understanding the mysterious Madden-Julian Oscillation

Lin, Meiyun

Lin, Meiyun

Advancing knowledge of air quality interactions with weather and climate

Nielsen-Gammon, John

Nielsen-Gammon, John

Informing Texas with climate data and information

Otkin, Jason

Otkin, Jason

Predicting rapidly-developing droughts based on plant stress

Connect with Research.NOAA.gov

Office of Oceanic & Atmospheric Research Headquarters

1315 East-West Highway | Silver Spring, MD 20910 | 301-713-2458